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David F. Muir, Ph.D.

David F. MuirDivision

Child Health Research Institute

Academic Title

Professor of Pediatrics and Neuroscience

Contact Information

352-392-0312 (phone)
352-392-9520 (fax)
muir@mbi.ufl.edu

Office

Academic Research Building, Room RG-174

Lab

Academic Research Building, Room RG-156

Research Overview

Dr. Muir’s research laboratory focuses on pathology and repair of the peripheral nervous system. He has developed several strategies to improve nerve repair and regeneration using activators of nerve growth and biologically engineered nerve allografts. He holds several patents on nerve grafting technologies, including the basis for the AVANCE nerve allograft used clinically for human nerve repair.

A second focus involves understanding the cause and developing new therapies for peripheral nerve tumors associated with Neurofibromatosis type 1. Dr. Muir has established the world’s most extensive collection of cell cultures from human NF1 tumors, many of which have become widespread research resources. In addition, his lab has developed several xenograft mouse models for collaborative projects in NF1 therapeutic development and testing

About

Dr. Muir is a Professor of Pediatrics/Neurology Division. He holds a joint appointment in the Department of Neuroscience, the McKnight Brain Institute and UF Shands Cancer Center. He earned his B.S. degree in Psychobiology from Tulane University (1974-1978) and Ph.D. in Biomedical Sciences & Neuroscience from Mount Sinai Medical Center, NY, NY (1983- 1987). Dr. Muir performed a postdoctoral fellowship in Neurobiology at the University of California, San Diego (1987-1991) and became an Assistant Professor at the University of Florida in 1991.

Key Publications

Additional publications can be found in PubMed.

  1. G.Q. Perrin, L. Fishbein, H. Li, S.A. Thomson, M. Hwang, M. Scarborough, A. Yachnis, M. Wallace, T. Mareci, D. Muir. 2007. An orthotopic xenograft model of NF1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor suggests a potential association between steroid hormones and tumor cell proliferation. Lab. Invest. 87: 1092-1102.
  2. G.Q. Perrin, L. Fishbein, S.A. Thomson, K. Stephens, J. Garbern, A.T. Yachnis,, M.R. Wallace D. Muir. 2007. Plexiform neurofibromas developed in the mouse by xenograft of an NF1 tumor-derived Schwann cell line. J. Neurosci. Res. 85(6): 1347-1357.
  3. D. Neubauer, J.B. Graham, D. Muir. 2007. Chondroitinase treatment increases the effective length of acellular nerve grafts. Exp. Neurol. 207: 163-170.
  4. J.B. Graham, D. Neubauer, Q-S. Xue, D. Muir. 2007. Chondroitinase applied to peripheral nerve repair averts retrograde axonal regeneration. Exp. Neurol. 203: 185-195.
  5. M. Wu, M.R. Wallace, D. Muir. 2006. Nf1 haploinsufficiency augments angiogenesis. Oncogene 25: 2297-303.